REL 113: Old Testament Faith and History, fall 2001.  Final Exam Review.                                                          RJDKnauth

The Exam is worth 20% of the final grade.  For review, you may wish to refer to: 
Midterm Review sheets, Pentateuch and History handouts, Prophets handout, Writings handout, and Hill.

The exam will be essay format (short and long), building upon the foundation of specific knowledge you have gained through the course.  Use specific examples with which to support your answers.  The following are representative of the sorts of questions you can expect, on topics from the review sheets.  In addition, there will be quotes to interpret.  The quotes will be taken from the midterms, quizzes and handouts.

You may bring one 8½ x11 sheet with notes on basic ids and time line to the exam to use.
You must do your own, and it must be turned in with your exam.

I.  Pentateuch. 30 minutes, worth 5% of final grade. 3 short (5 min) essays, 1 longer (10 min) essay.  Issues:

What is the most crucial historical event of the Israelites?  Justify your answer.

What is Literary/Source Criticism and how can it solve problems in the text? Use examples. Who were J, E, P and D?

Explain the nature of “tradition criticism” and the significance of “life-setting.” Give examples.

Discuss the nature and purpose of the “Primordial History” (Gen. 1-11): Creation, Fall, Cain & Able, Flood, Tower.

Discuss God’s promise to Abraham, and the significance of the “binding of Isaac” (Gen. 22).

Discuss the theme of sibling rivalry in the Pentateuch and its significance within the narrative.

What were the purposes of the Plagues in Egypt? What exactly happened at the Red Sea, and according to whom?

Discuss the nature of the Mosaic Covenant and Biblical Law (in comparison to ANE law and modern law).

What is the significance of the wilderness rebellion stories within the narrative?

What is the major message of Leviticus?  How does this fit in with the rest of scripture?

What is Deuteronomy? How was it significant within Israel? What are its major concerns?

            What is the Midianite Hypothesis?  What is the evidence for (or against) it?

 

II.  Histories. 30 minutes, worth 5% of final grade. 3 short (5 min) essays, 1 longer (10 min) essay.  Issues:

What is the Deuteronomistic History?  What is the Chronicler’s History? How and why are they different?

What is the major concern of Joshua? What is the major concern of Judges? Does this explain their differences?

Who were the Philistines and what was their significance within Israelite history?

What was the Charismatic Leadership Ideal in Israel? Discuss the institution of the monarchy: issues pro and con.

Discuss the Ark of the Covenant – its nature and significance within the narrative.

Why did God reject Saul while David is called the “man after God’s own heart”?

What was David’s motive for moving his capital to Jerusalem and bringing the Ark there?

Discuss the purpose of the “Succession Narrative” (chaos among David’s sons, especially Absalom’s rebellion).

Discuss the significance of the Davidic Covenant and the controversy over the building of the Temple.

Who were Manasseh and Josiah, and what was their significance within Israelite historiography?

What was the crisis of exile, and how did the Israelites deal with that crisis?  Give examples.

What was the main concern of the Restoration period? Justify your answer.

 

III.  Prophets. 30 minutes, worth 5% of final grade. 3 short (5 min) essays, 1 longer (10 min) essay.  Issues:

What was the main role of the prophets within Israelite society? Justify your answer, use examples.

Why did the prophets rail against alliances and intermarriage? Use examples.

            What was the “Prophetic Revolution” in relation to the development of monotheism?

What was the significance of Amos claiming not to be a prophet or the son of a prophet?

            What is the theological significance of Elijah’s theophany and confrontation with the prophets of Baal?

            Explain why some scholars think the 2nd part of Isaiah (ch. 40 and following) was written during the exile.

            Why do some scholars think that Jeremiah might have written the Deuteronomistic History?

            Discuss the prophetic critique of the Sacrificial system in Israel.  What was its basis?

            What happened at Shiloh, and in Sennacherib’s siege of Jerusalem, and why is this significant in Jeremiah?

            What was Samuel’s opinion of the Monarchical system, and why?  Was he right?

            What is “prophetic symbolism”?  Give some examples and explain their significance to Israel.

            What was the significance of Ezekiel’s valley of dry bones?  Explain.

 

IV.  Writings. 30 minutes, worth 5% of final grade. 3 short (5 min) essays, 1 longer (10 min) essay.  Issues:

How does “Form Criticism” help us in understanding the Psalms? Use examples.

Discuss the nature and language of the Psalms (or the Song of Solomon) and their role in scripture.

Where did “Proverbs” come from?  What is the evidence for this?

Discuss the nature and significance of Ecclesiastes.

In what sense is Job fighting against traditional wisdom? Explain.

Discuss God’s response to Job’s challenge.  How does this help him?  How does this help us?

            What does Jonah say about the character of God (at least three aspects)? Explain.

            What is the significance of the book of Ruth?

            Discuss the significance of the book of Esther.

What made Daniel and Esther heroes and ideal models for the Jew under foreign domination?

What are the characteristics of the genre of Apocalyptic?

What led up to the Maccabaean Revolt, and why do scholars date Daniel to this period?

 

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